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Virtually all data captured and stored today is protected by “factoring algorithms” – long strings of numbers divided by unique prime-number keys.  The science is simple…. it would take a traditional bits-and-bytes computer (even a “super-computer”) years to crack these numerical locks. But quantum computers might soon be able to crack those safes in fractions of a second, exposing all your data, the government’s data, heck everyone’s data for all the world to see.  This article does a nice job of simply explaining quantum computing and the types of applications it will likely dominate in the next decade or so (hint: lots of AI).
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Here’s a provocative POV on why all the hype around autonomous driving vehicles is, well, just that.  This article makes some strong points underscoring an opinion that, while we are very likely to see autonomous delivery vehicles become prevalent in the next 10 years, passenger-carrying vehicles will lag far behind.  Implication for investors: the runway will need to be alot longer to get to consumer purchase.
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Here’s a new twist….  Upside Travel, by the founders of Priceline, is turning the travel aggregator model on its head by concentrating on business travelers and offering the individual booking the travel a share of the savings when they combine air, hotel, and ground options together. Early users are reporting substantial rebates, and companies are saving too.  Excellent potential.
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We’re beginning to see a shake-out in the increasingly crowded marketplace for seed-stage investing.  Fewer deals; bigger investments; tighter restrictions on valuation and more stringent preferred shareholder anti-dilution rights.  Here’s a great (brief) summary based on recent Pitchbook data.

I suspect the “spray and pray” strategy will soon be revealed to have been shockingly dumb, and that the premium will again be place on adding the value of expertise, mentoring, and careful guidance back into the equation of “what drives returns”.
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The Norwegians are pioneering the use of autonomous ships for short/regional cargo hauling.  Here’s WSJ article.  

This has me wondering about the potential to focus our infrastructure debate in the US away from highways and back to the old days of canals.  Specifically, I’m wondering if we should think about highways as being the principle paths for passenger traffic and local deliveries and then look to “cargo canals” to help move freight silently and cleanly via solar-powered ships and locks.
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